August 6th- August 10th

 

Tuesday, August 6th– Ndop District Hospital!

Today I finished up my report in the morning, and in the afternoon I visited my friend Stanley who works at the Ndop District Hospital as a nurse in the emergency room. It was very interesting to see the facilities, or lack thereof. While I was there, a girl was brought into the ER room and I was astonished by the lack of attention the doctor/nurse paid to her. Stanley even asked me to take a photo of him while he was examining her! Although the actual facilities were questionable, as expected in a third world country, the scenery was amazing. I must say I would not mind being treated in a hospital in a valley with gorgeous mountains on all sides!

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Wednesday, August 7th– Cameroonian Drama!

Today was my last day of work, but it was definitely the most culturally shocking! Because of a disagreement between me and my boss there was a lot of discussing and arguing, that ended up involving the entire Cameroonian family I stayed with (you can ask me details personally). Somehow the arguing went from intense to them professing they were all family again. I was given a certificate of appreciation by my boss and he told me he would write me any recommendation I wanted, very nice of him.

Tonight I had a dinner at another missionary family’s house and got to munch on cheese, humus, and pepper spread, very yummy!  The family consisted of a mom, dad and 7 year old son, along with their friend Janelle who is 30 years old. It was great being able to talk to them about my work and Cameroonian culture; it is amazing how much you can learn from an outsider that locals don’t think to tell you!

Thursday, August 8th– Sallah!

Muslims around the world have been fasting for a month during Ramadan, and I got to go to Sallah, the breaking of their fast in a village called Sabga. The Jackson’s invited me to go with them and Chris drove me up in the morning, which took about an hour. This Sallah was pretty laid back and I spent most of the day hanging out with the girls. The scenery is absolutely gorgeous there, and I appreciated having a chance to spend one last day in the bush before I leave for home. We feasted on rice, beef, vegetables, and even got to have tea with real milk! I must say the meat here in Cameroon is a lost tastier than in America!

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Friday, August 9th– Bye, bye Bamenda!

This morning Stanley picked me up at 7:30 AM and whisked me off to the bus station. We took Amour Mezam, a nice little coach for the 7 hour drive from Bamenda to Douala. It was cool seeing all the sites again with the eyes of a more experienced Cameroonian traveler. We arrived in Douala at around 4:00 and took several taxis to get to Stanley’s co-worker’s family’s house. As it turns out, this house is very close to the airport and is actually in the slums outside of Douala. However, it has a guard at the front and the family is well respected and known in the area. I stayed in the reverend sister’s room for the night, and got to enjoy all of the loud noise of the city!

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Saturday, August 10th– Last day in Cameroon!

This morning we went into town to check in with Brussels Airlines and visit around. It is very reminiscent of France and the disparity between the slum in which the family lives and down town is pretty astonishing. However, I feel safer in the slum with all of my Cameroonian contacts than in the city; all of the tall buildings and development is a reverse culture shock to me! Right now I am sitting getting my hair braided Rasta style. Let’s see if my mom reads this before she picks me up at the airport tomorrow!

I have had a phenomenal time in Cameroon and I am sad to see it come to a close. Thank you all for you prayers for a safe return and I promise to not miss any of my flights if I can help it! I must specifically thank all of my donors and family members; I would not be here without your love and support. I must also thank Molly for leading me to the GPP Minor, Chetan and Sean, my GPP minor advisors, and Clare my pre-practice professor! Thank you for following my blog and believing in my even when I have doubted myself and my work here. I am so excited to learn about other GPP students’ experiences and to give everyone a big hug!

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